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Isla Plana, Spain. Fuji X-100, Tom Rice-Smyth

Hello

So this is going to be my new blog in which I will post photos, essays, tips, and insights about B&W and colour photography. I will also review books as I add them to my library. These reviews will not be formal reviews as I’m not a writer but will be based on my response to the book and what it has to offer.

I want to dispel a lot of myths and bad practices about B&W film processing and printing. My first article will be a 5 part ‘How to’ for all B&W film shooters. It will go into choice of film, developers and what to use and how to develop you film for a classical look (full-scale image). You will then be so familiar with the process that you will be able to manipulate the entire process to get the look you want.

There will be articles about getting started, how to calibrate film and best practices as I see it, along with descriptions of the kind of random marks on film from processing. I will get into film choices ‘where and why’, chemistry choices. You may see it differently so please chime in with your comments. I would like to build up a community of film and digital lovers as I see both co-existing, with both having plus and minuses.

Please leave a comment below and tell me what you think and what suggestions you think I could incorporate!

So I will start with an overview of film processing and how you should start this journey.

All the best and I look forward to our future journey together.

I’ll leave today with a quote from Luigi Ghirri, an artist who’s work I admire greatly.

“When I travel, I take two kinds of photographs: the typical ones that everyone takes, and which, in the end, I’m hardly interested in; and the others, the ones I really care about, and the only ones that I really consider ‘my own’. In this second category of photographs, the subjects are every day objects, things found in our ordinary field of vision – images that we are used to looking at passively. Isolated from the reality which surrounds them and presented in a photograph as part of a different discourse, these images become laden with new meaning.”

“When I travel, I take two kinds of photographs: the typical ones that everyone takes, and which, in the end, I’m hardly interested in; and the others, the ones I really care about, and the only ones that I really consider ‘my own’. In this second category of photographs, the subjects are every day objects, things found in our ordinary field of vision – images that we are used to looking at passively. Isolated from the reality which surrounds them and presented in a photograph as part of a different discourse, these images become laden with new meaning.”

L. Ghirri (2016) The Complete Essays 1973-1991

Mack: London Cardboard Landscapes: 1973, Luigi Ghirri.